MJ's L.O.V.E. Is Magical

Internet safety tips for teens and for the rest of us

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Internet safety tips for teens and for the rest of us

Post by midangerous on Wed Oct 03, 2012 7:20 pm

With the World we live in today, it's important that we know how to stay safe when online at ALL times here are some safety tips that we should all read carefully:


1. Don’t give out personal information about yourself, your family situation, your school, your telephone number, or your address.

2. If you become aware of the sharing, use, or viewing of child pornography online, immediately report this to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at 1-800-843-5678.

3. When in chatrooms remember that not everyone may be who they say they are. For example a person who says "she" is a 14-year-old girl from New York may really be a 42-year-old man from California.1

4. If someone harasses you online, says anything inappropriate, or does anything that makes you feel uncomfortable, contact your Internet service provider.

5. Know that there are rules many Internet Service Providers (ISP) have about online behavior. If you disobey an ISP's rules, your ISP may penalize you by disabling your account, and sometimes every account in a household, either temporarily or permanently.

6. Consider volunteering at your local library, school, or Boys & Girls Club to help younger children online. Many schools and nonprofit organizations are in need of people to help set up their computers and Internet capabilities.

7. A friend you meet online may not be the best person to talk to if you are having problems at home, with your friends, or at school - remember the teenage "girl" from New York in Tip number three? If you can't find an adult in your school, church, club, or neighborhood to talk to, Covenant House is a good place to call at 1-800-999-9999. The people there provide counseling to kids, refer them to local shelters, help them with law enforcement, and can serve as mediators by calling their parents.

8. If you are thinking about running away, a friend from online (remember the 14-year-old girl) may not be the best person to talk to. If there is no adult in your community you can find to talk to, call the National Runaway Switchboard at 1-800-621-4000. Although some of your online friends may seem to really listen to you, the Switchboard will be able to give you honest, useful answers to some of your questions about what to do when you are depressed, abused, or thinking about running away.2


[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

Here some more tips:

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
avatar
midangerous

Posts : 3090
Join date : 2012-07-23
Age : 28
Location : United States

Back to top Go down

Re: Internet safety tips for teens and for the rest of us

Post by Admin on Wed Oct 03, 2012 9:31 pm

Thank you midangerous for this important information.

The following is for all who may be a member on this site:

If there is anything said on this forum to you specifically or in a thread generally that is against this forums policies (please see "rules of conduct" written for just this "MJ's Love Is Magical" site), please report it to either the admin or MJ Mod immediately. We do have a ZERO tolerance policy here and any harrassment, bullying, or inappropriate behaviors will be dealt with by the staff swiftly. Please do not confront the person in public on the forum or engage in any way with the person in PM if it is leading to argument. Ignore and report to admin/mods in PM.

Thank you and enjoy the MJ fanmily we are building here along with keeping your Michaeling safe!



_________________
Michael Jackson transcended our imaginations and continues to uplift our souls and spirits through his tremendously meaningful life well lived.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 6059
Join date : 2012-07-22
Location : USA

Back to top Go down

Re: Internet safety tips for teens and for the rest of us

Post by midangerous on Sun Jun 23, 2013 5:46 pm

If you have twitter, follow these safety tips:


Safety tips for teens

Twitter is a communications platform that brings you closer to the things you care about.  At the heart of Twitter are small bursts of information called Tweets. Each Tweet is 140 characters long. You can also get links, see photos, videos, news stories and participate in conversations all directly in Tweets. To learn more, please visit the Twitter Basics help page.
Twitter is a fun way to connect with what is interesting to you. However, it’s worth considering some of the possible safety issues that could come up. Here are some tips to help you have a positive experience.

What you can do:

  • Think before you tweet
  • Don't share your account
  • Respect others
  • Keep a healthy life balance
  • Block and ignore

When it has gone too far:

  • Talk it out
  • Report a violation
  • Talk to someone with authority

What you can do:
Think before you Tweet
Information you post on Twitter is public, so your Tweets can be read by someone you didn’t intend, or made available or shared on other websites.  Even though you can delete a Tweet as soon as it’s posted, someone else could save or share it before you delete it.

You can protect your Tweets so only approved followers can view them. To learn more about public and protected accounts, check out this article: Public and Protected Accounts on Twitter. Even if your Tweets are set to protected, be mindful of who you authorize to view your account.

Remember that once you've posted something on the Internet, it's highly unlikely you can delete it/remove it before someone else sees it.  Ask yourself, “Would you say the same thing offline in front of your parents, teachers, principal, or potential employer?” If the answer is “no,” consider whether or not you should Tweet it.  
Don’t share your account
If you share your account username and password with someone else, that person could post Tweets pretending to be you, or change the password and email on your account and lock you out. Pick a strong password and don’t share it with anyone. The same goes for your email and other online accounts.
Respect others
Avoid getting into fights or confrontations with others online. Remember that others are entitled to their opinions, just as you are entitled to yours. If you don't agree with someone, it's fine to discuss the disagreement—but once it's clear that the situation has escalated, arguing further most likely won't make the other person change his or her mind.

Don’t feed the trolls and don’t be a troll. If someone posts something about you that you do not like, consider asking them to take it down. Likewise, if you post a photo or information about someone else and they ask you to remove it, respect their privacy and retain their trust by taking it down. Read this Twitter Support article to learn how to delete a Tweet.
Keep a healthy life balance  
Regardless of how positive your online experience is, remember that there is a world outside of your computer. While Twitter brings you closer to what is important to you, your online activities should enhance your offline life, not replace it.
Block and ignore
If you are receiving offensive Tweets, we've found that the most successful response is to simply block the user or ignore the comments. If you don’t engage the bully, they often lose interest and stop harassing you. This Twitter support article shows how to block other users.
If you're being bullied online as a continuation of bullying you're experiencing offline, please talk to a trusted adult or report the bullying to the appropriate authorities. If you're not sure who to talk to, Stop Bullying is a website you may find helpful.  
When it has gone too far:
Sometimes online relationships or interactions can affect you offline. If you feel uncomfortable or unsafe as a result of something that happened online, it's important you take steps to address your feelings. Consider the following possibilities.
Talk it out
When dealing with negative or hurtful interactions, it can help to turn to siblings, parents, teachers or other people you trust for support and advice. Oftentimes, talking it out with your parents or a close friend may help you figure out how you want to handle the situation or let you express your feelings so you can move on.
However, we also recognize that options may be limited. If you don’t have someone to talk to about what is happening online, there are many online resources that may help:

  • Teen Line | @teenlineonline
  • Stop Bullying | @stopbullyinggov
  • A Thin Line | @a_thin_line
  • That Girl in Pink | @benni_cinkle

Report a violation
Get to know the Twitter Rules and Policies.
After reviewing our policies, if you believe an account is violating our rules, you or your child can file a report.  
Twitter only removes profiles that are in violation of the Twitter Rules and Terms of Service. Please remember Twitter is a communications platform rather than a content provider and we do not mediate disputes between users.
Talk to someone with authority
When dealing with someone who is breaking rules, threatening or otherwise harassing you, talk to someone who can help you evaluate the situation to determine what your options are. This could be a teacher or administrator at school, a parent, an older sibling or other family member. This could also be law enforcement or a lawyer.

Safety tips for parents
The Internet is a great resource, but it's important for you and your child to be aware of the challenges and issues that can occur online.  As parents you may be wondering "What is Twitter?" or “What do I need to know to help keep my child safe online?”
Whether you’re a tech-savvy parent or still having trouble using a mouse and keyboard, we've compiled some tips both for you and for you to share with your child about different issues or situations they may encounter online. Not a parent? Check out our Tips for Teachers or Tips for Teens for more information.
What you can do:

  • Understand Twitter
  • Remember Twitter is a public space
  • Protect passwords
  • Use online safety to connect with your child
  • Keep a healthy life balance
  • Encourage critical thinking
  • Think before Tweeting
  • Block and ignore

When it has gone too far:

  • Coordinate with educators and other parents
  • Report a violation
  • Contact local law or legal representation

Learn more
What you can do
Understand Twitter
Twitter is a communications platform that brings you closer to the things you care about.  
At the heart of Twitter are small bursts of information called Tweets. Each Tweet is 140 characters long. You can also get links, see photos, videos, news stories and participate in conversations all directly in Tweets. To learn more, please visit the Twitter Basics help page.
Remember Twitter is a public space
Most of the communication taking place on Twitter is public and viewable by everyone. Since the information posted is public, some of this data may be made available or republished on other websites.

While Tweets can be protected so only approved followers can see them, most users share their Tweets with everyone. If your child wants their Tweets to only be available to approved followers, they can protect their Tweets. Please keep in mind that any Tweets posted before they were protected may be available in search or through third party sites.
Protect passwords
Explain to your child that passwords should never be shared, not even with their friends. If the home computer is shared, remind them to always log out when they finish their Twitter session to develop good online safety habits. It's important to log out of any websites they logged into on a shared computer, otherwise, other people may be able to access their information.
Use online safety to connect with your child
Teens in particular may feel like parents are disconnected from their perspective and fear conversations about online safety will be awkward or embarrassing. Listen to how your child is using Twitter and other online mediums. Take their online relationships seriously. Ask questions and perhaps even brainstorm together to come up with solutions to safety issues they have encountered.
Keep a healthy life balance
As a parent, you're a role model for your child. Demonstrate the importance of a balance between online and other activities by encouraging family activities online as well as offline.
Encourage critical thinking
Take the opportunity to not only learn about the sorts of situations your child is experiencing online but also use these to identify solutions and encourage critical thinking. Ask them questions like:

  • Who are you sharing this information with?
  • Can you trust all the people that see the information on your profile?
  • How could your Tweet be interpreted?

Think before Tweeting
As parents, you may have seen children say or write things that were not meant to be hurtful but that others found offensive or upsetting. Help your child evaluate whether or not something is okay to post by reminding them that if they wouldn't say it to the person's face or out loud, they shouldn't say it online either.

The nature of the Internet makes it difficult to completely erase content. Consider having a conversation about how what gets posted online can hurt feelings, affect offline relationships and even jeopardize future opportunities.
Block and ignore
If your child receives offensive tweets from another Twitter user, we generally recommend that he or she block that user and end communication. Ignoring the content shows unwillingness to engage in such interaction, and in most cases, the aggressor loses interest. Blocking the user will empower your child by preventing the blocked user from following them. This Twitter Support article explains how to block other users.
When it has gone too far
If the unwanted online behavior is persistent, it may be rooted in "real world" relationships. If your child is experiencing repetitive cyber-bullying or interpersonal conflicts that are also taking place online, consider taking the following actions.
Coordinate with educators and other parents
Many issues can be resolved by working with school officials, other parents, or local authorities. While school officials may be unaware of what your child is dealing with, they may have additional resources or be able to offer assistance once you've talked to them about what's going on.
Report a violation
Get to know the Twitter Rules and Policies.
After reviewing our policies, if you believe an account is violating our rules, you or your child can file a report.  

Twitter only removes profiles that are in violation of the Twitter Rules and Terms of Service. Please remember Twitter is a communications platform rather than a content provider and we do not mediate disputes between users.
Contact local law enforcement or legal representation
Twitter will investigate every report received, but if something has gone beyond the point of a personal conflict and has turned into credible threats, whether it be online or offline, you should contact your local authorities as they are in the best position to assess the threat and intervene or assist as necessary.

If contacted by law enforcement directly, we can work with them and provide the necessary information for their investigation of your issue. You can point local law enforcement to our Law Enforcement Guidelines.
If you feel the issues are legal in nature, please seek advice from a lawyer. Twitter cannot offer any legal advice, nor can we provide other users' information except as required by valid legal process.

Safety tips for teachers
Most students are active users of the Internet, whether via their desktop, laptop, iPad or smartphone. The Internet is a great resource, but it's important for you and your students to be aware of the challenges and issues that can occur online.
As a teacher, you're uniquely positioned to provide valuable guidance and insight for your students around areas related to online safety. We've compiled some tips for you to share with your students about different situations they may encounter online.
What you can do:

  • Understand Twitter
  • Remember Twitter is a public space
  • Protect passwords
  • Keep your account secure
  • Use online safety to connect with your students
  • Communicate and respect personal boundaries
  • Think before Tweeting
  • Consider the context
  • Block and ignore

When it has gone too far:

  • Involve parents and school administrators
  • Report a violation

Learn more
What you can do:
Understand Twitter
Twitter is a communications platform that brings you closer to the things you care about.  
At the heart of Twitter are small bursts of information called Tweets. Each Tweet is 140 characters long. You can also get links, see photos, videos, news stories and participate in conversations all directly in Tweets. To learn more, please visit the Twitter Basics help page.
Remember Twitter is a public space
Most of the communication taking place on Twitter is public and viewable to everyone. Since the information posted is public, some of this data may be made available or re-published on other websites.  If your students want their Tweets only to be available to approved followers, they can protect their Tweets. Please keep in mind that any Tweets posted before they were protected may be available in search or through third party sites.
Protect passwords
Passwords and accounts should never be shared. Remind students that it's important to log out of any websites they logged into on a shared computer, otherwise, other people may be able to access their information.

Keep your account secure
Learning about account security and taking proactive steps to keep your account secure is an important part of online safety. For detailed information read Keeping Your Account Secure.
Use online safety to connect with your students
Teens may feel like teachers are disconnected from their perspective and fear conversations about online safety will be awkward or embarrassing. Listen to how your students are using Twitter and other online mediums and take their online relationships seriously. Ask questions and perhaps even brainstorm together to come up with solutions to safety issues they have encountered.  
Ask questions like:

  • Who are you sharing this information with?
  • Can you trust all the people that see the information on your profile?
  • How could your Tweet be interpreted?

Communicate and respect personal boundaries
Remind your students that not everyone has the same definition of what is private and what should be shared.

If a student’s friend or connection has posted information they would prefer kept private, suggest students communicate with the person who posted the information and request it be taken down. Likewise, encourage your students to be considerate of others. If someone requests they remove information that they posted about someone else, they should respect their privacy and consider taking it down. Students can read this Twitter Support article to learn how to delete a Tweet.
Think before Tweeting
As teachers, you know teens say or write things that were not meant to be hurtful but that others found offensive or upsetting. Help teens evaluate whether or not something is okay to post by reminding them that if they wouldn't say it to the person's face, or out loud, they shouldn't say it online.

Students are often not aware that what gets posted online can hurt feelings, affect offline relationships and even jeopardize future college and/or career prospects. The nature of the Internet makes erasing content very difficult. Talking your students through a hypothetical example highlighting this may prove beneficial. Some examples are below:

  • Student A joins a group of people making fun of Student B’s online photo because they think they’ll never hang-out. A week later, classes are changed and partners assigned for projects. Student A is assigned to work with Student B for 3 weeks.
  • Student A posts a joke about violence and drugs intended for close friends. Their friend’s family member sees the post and contacts school administrators who investigate and call the police.

Consider the context
Individual Tweets can be confusing when read outside of their intended context. Has your student seen something offensive online? Is the Tweet part of a larger conversation? Here are some tips to help you Consider the Context.
Block and ignore
If a student is receiving offensive Tweets from another Twitter user, we generally recommend that he or she block that user and end communication. Ignoring the content shows unwillingness to engage in such interaction, and in most cases, the aggressor loses interest. Blocking the user also empowers the individual by preventing the blocked user from following them. ThisTwitter Support article explains how to block other users.
When it has gone too far:
If the unwanted online behavior is persistent, it may be rooted in "real world" relationships.  
If a student is experiencing repetitive cyber-bullying or interpersonal conflicts that are also taking place online, consider taking the following actions.
Involve parents and school administrators
Many issues are likely to be resolved by working with the student’s parents who may not be aware of the situation. Encourage parents to talk about online safety issues that may arise.  Responsible use of the Internet should be promoted at both school and home.

For more serious cases, involve the school administrator and be sure to know and communicate your school’s Internet safety policies.  
Report a violation
Get to know the Twitter Rules and Policies.

After reviewing our policies, if you believe an account is violating our rules, encourage the student or their parents to file a report.

Twitter only removes profiles that are in violation of the Twitter Rules and Terms of Service.  Please remember that as Twitter is a communications platform rather than a content provider, we do not mediate disputes between users.

Twitter Help Center | Safety & Security
avatar
midangerous

Posts : 3090
Join date : 2012-07-23
Age : 28
Location : United States

Back to top Go down

Re: Internet safety tips for teens and for the rest of us

Post by ijustcan'tstoplovinguMJ on Sun Jun 23, 2013 5:57 pm

thanks for all the tips! this is a good thread! i know most of that but its always good to have a refresher!
avatar
ijustcan'tstoplovinguMJ

Posts : 2353
Join date : 2013-02-11
Age : 18

Back to top Go down

New online child safety rules aim to protect kids on social media, smartphones

Post by Admin on Sat Jul 06, 2013 12:38 pm

New online child safety rules aim to protect kids on social media, smartphones

Bob Sullivan, Columnist NBC News

Although the new Child Online Privacy Protection Act is now in effect, it may take some keen monitoring to make sure companies are following the law.

New rules aimed at protecting children using the Internet took effect Monday. This update makes the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) more relevant in the social media and mobile phone age, and places some additional burdens on companies that target kids under 13. The rules went live over objections from industry groups which recently requested a postponement.

Websites and phone apps that collect photos or geo-location data from children must now obtain express permission from parents, putting that data in the same category as kids' email or home addresses. The new rules also make firms more responsible for data collection by third parties, a loophole that had been exploited by marketers in the past.

Parents might not notice much change at first. Some apps that kids use might begin requesting parental permissions via emails or other methods, and parents should make sure kids don't circumvent those rules by using fake email address to grant themselves permission.

The Center for Digital Democracy, a privacy advocacy group, hailed the move, saying the law needed to be updated for the age of Big Data.

"Today marks an important moment for parents of children 12 and under," said Jeff Chester, the group’s executive director. "Finally their child's privacy online — whether they use a mobile phone, tablet, gaming device or computer — is protected. The new ... rules put the parent in charge of what data can be collected from their child."

Others worry that the stricter rules will mean some companies will stop making kids' apps and that young tech users will lie their way onto adult services instead of going through the steps needed to get parental permission.

"The Rule may be counterproductive, lessening the quality and scope of content directed specifically to children, which may encourage more children to visit general audience sites," wrote the law firm Hogan Lovells, which specializes in privacy, in a blog post.

Original law passed in 1998
Congress passed the original COPPA law in 1998, long before services like Twitter or Facebook existed, and put the Federal Trade Commission in charge of keeping it current.

Industry groups were sour on the changes from the minute the FTC proposed them last year. The Interactive Advertising Bureau, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and several other groups made a last-ditch attempt this spring to convince the FTC to postpone implementation of the changes for six months in order to prepare for the update. But in a letter dated May 6, the FTC rejected the request, essentially saying the groups had plenty of time to get ready.

But the FTC signaled that it would go easy on enforcement for awhile.

“We continue to be mindful of the impact of the Rule on businesses. As with all of our enforcement activities, the Commission will exercise prosecutorial discretion in enforcing the Rule, particularly with respect to small businesses that have attempted to comply with the Rule in good faith in the early months," the agency said.

Facebook and children
Kids already have a very complicated relationship with popular sites like Facebook, with various actors playing out an online kabuki dance. Facebook, for example, doesn't allow under 13 kids to use its site, so the firm isn't subject to COPPA restrictions. But millions of kids lie their way onto the social network anyway, and half the parents of 12-year-old kids say their kids use the site.

The new COPPA won't have any real impact on this circumvention, but it might impact third-party developers who target kids on Facebook, said privacy law expert Bradley Shear.

"I believe the updates will require Facebook to become more vigilant about policing the apps they allow on their website. The FTC has fired a warning shot to not only Facebook but to other digital ecosystems that they must do a better job of ensuring that they protect the personal privacy of children," he said. "I think the FTC may start cracking down on digital platforms that are looking the other way regarding the age of its users. "

Facebook told NBC News Monday that it's "in the process of updating our terms and policies" to reflect the new rules. "For our part, we encourage developers to become familiar with our revised policies, particularly around social plugins," a company representative said.

The COPPA update includes other provisions aimed at protecting children, too. Firms are forbidden from using digital identifiers, like cookies, to track kids and to serve them ads based on their behaviors. It also forces firms to delete data they do collect on kids for purely technological reasons as soon as possible.

While the changes might not be enforced immediately, or noticed by users, the Center for Democracy and Technology has already begin a public effort to make sure the new rules have some bite. It sent a letter to dozens of partner organizations asking that they police the Web watching for COPPA violations.

"There are a lot of child-directed websites and apps out there, so we are going to need all the help we can get making sure that after July 1, all are following the new children’s privacy rules," the letter says, and includes an email address for notifying the organization and the FTC.

The FTC recently published a frequently-asked-questions primer on the new rules for parents and businesses.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]


_________________
Michael Jackson transcended our imaginations and continues to uplift our souls and spirits through his tremendously meaningful life well lived.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 6059
Join date : 2012-07-22
Location : USA

Back to top Go down

Re: Internet safety tips for teens and for the rest of us

Post by WeAreTheWorld. on Sun Jul 07, 2013 3:05 am

Interesting, glad these new laws are being put into place!
avatar
WeAreTheWorld.

Posts : 1967
Join date : 2012-07-22
Age : 20
Location : United States

Back to top Go down

Re: Internet safety tips for teens and for the rest of us

Post by Admin on Sat Aug 03, 2013 2:54 pm

Another great site:

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

Internet safety helpdesk and hotline:
1-888-nets-411


_________________
Michael Jackson transcended our imaginations and continues to uplift our souls and spirits through his tremendously meaningful life well lived.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 6059
Join date : 2012-07-22
Location : USA

Back to top Go down

Re: Internet safety tips for teens and for the rest of us

Post by ijustcan'tstoplovinguMJ on Sat Aug 03, 2013 8:01 pm

i'm loving the app for the ipad that limits what ur younger kids watch and how long they play! its great!
avatar
ijustcan'tstoplovinguMJ

Posts : 2353
Join date : 2013-02-11
Age : 18

Back to top Go down

Re: Internet safety tips for teens and for the rest of us

Post by Capricious Anomaly on Sat Aug 03, 2013 8:53 pm

I think the Kindle has that as well - the app for parents to set the times for reading books-watching videos and playing games-it is a GREAT idea.
avatar
Capricious Anomaly

Posts : 1446
Join date : 2012-07-23
Age : 50
Location : USA

Back to top Go down

Re: Internet safety tips for teens and for the rest of us

Post by ijustcan'tstoplovinguMJ on Sun Aug 04, 2013 2:51 pm

yeah i think so too!
avatar
ijustcan'tstoplovinguMJ

Posts : 2353
Join date : 2013-02-11
Age : 18

Back to top Go down

Internet safety tips for teens and for the rest of us

Post by Admin on Thu Sep 05, 2013 7:39 am

6 Tips for Keeping Teens Safe on Social Media

Help your kids make safe and smart decisions about what they put on social networking sites  

WASHINGTON, Sept. 3, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Going back to school is about more than shiny shoes and trendy notebooks. It's also about kids making new friends and adding those friends on social network sites like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

More than 60 percent of teens in the United States have at least one social media account, according to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. And while being online is a good way to keep in touch with friends, it's important for parents to be proactive about Internet safety.

Unfortunately, there are people who can use your child's personal information to steal identities, bully them or begin an inappropriate relationship. Help protect students from online dangers by following these safety tips:
1.Keep your child's profile private so that only family and people you know see photos, important dates and other information.
2.Make sure they're not posting personal details, including phone numbers, home address, and the name of their school or Social Security number.
3.Only allow them to publish photos and videos that don't jeopardize their safety or their integrity.  
4.Make sure they choose a strong password that can't be guessed, and that it gets changed every three months.
5.Never allow them to accept friend requests from people they don't know.  
6.Keep an open dialogue with your children. Ask them to let you know if they've received private messages from a stranger, or from someone at school who is teasing, harassing or threatening them. Those could be signs of cyber-bullying or even a sexual predator.

Get additional online safety tips, and other relevant information on OnGuardOnline.gov, a great government resource for parents and teens.

USA.gov and GobiernoUSA.gov are the U.S. Government's official web portals in English and Spanish, and part of the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA).


SOURCE GobiernoUSA.gov/USA.gov


_________________
Michael Jackson transcended our imaginations and continues to uplift our souls and spirits through his tremendously meaningful life well lived.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 6059
Join date : 2012-07-22
Location : USA

Back to top Go down

Re: Internet safety tips for teens and for the rest of us

Post by Admin on Thu Sep 05, 2013 8:19 am

Back to School safety tips
by Jonathan Copsey

August 14, 2013

Alpharetta police Officer David Tobias gives residents some back to school tips for safety.

Phone numbers

With today's technological world, kids need to know more phone numbers than ever before. This is especially true for kids that are from split families. To make things a little easier, type everyone's numbers that the kids might need on a piece of paper or a card.

When you are done, have the cards laminated. If the kids are old enough to carry a wallet, it will slip inside easily. If they are younger, you can punch a hole in the card and lace it into their school backpack, so they will not lose it. Also, make sure their school has updated contact information.

Car safety

Please be sure everyone is properly seat-belted into your vehicle before putting the car into gear. Younger kids should be in car seats or booster seats, and they should sit in the back seat if they are under 12 years old. Drop the kids as close to the school as possible. If the school has a drop off area, be sure to use it. Do not set a bad example by dropping them in a dangerous location. If the kids are young, wait until they are in the school yard or building before you leave.

Walking to school the safe way

Plan the route your kids are going to take if they are walking to school. It is important to try to minimize the number of streets they have to cross. Keep it as simple as possible. Then, do a dry run with your kids. You should have them do it at least once on their own before the first day of school, so they feel comfortable. Teach your kids to keep away from vacant lots, fields and any other locations that have few people around.

Also, please make sure that your kids do not walk alone, especially if they are young. Creeps look for the kids that are all alone. It is much more difficult to deal with a bunch of kids, so they normally do not do it.

Family meeting spot

Make sure to pick out a family meeting spot that can be used in case of an emergency. Parents with kids in middle school and high school should make sure they do not forget this. When there is a crisis, things get confusing. If they know where they are supposed to meet you, you will both be calmer. In any emergency, please tell your kids (who carry cell phones) to call 911 first. We can't help you if we don't know something is happening.

Stranger safety

Teach your kids not to talk to strangers. They should not accept presents or rides from them. Also, be sure to pick a family password. This word will be used if someone different is picking them up from school, sports or other locations. It should be a weird word, like spaghetti. One that someone would not be able to guess. If too many people have heard your word, change it.

After school safety

If the kids are alone after school for a short time, make sure that they follow some basic guidelines:

They should keep the doors locked.

They should never tell someone on the phone that there are no adults at home. Teach them to say that you can't come to the phone right now.

Post a list of emergency phone numbers near the phone.

Have them call you at work or on your cell phone as soon as they get home.

Set up rules on what kind of food they can fix. Younger children should never use the stove without adult supervision.

Be sure to set up guidelines on who they can have over (if anyone) and what they are allowed to do. Also, tell your close neighbors to call 911 if they see any suspicious activity.


_________________
Michael Jackson transcended our imaginations and continues to uplift our souls and spirits through his tremendously meaningful life well lived.
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 6059
Join date : 2012-07-22
Location : USA

Back to top Go down

Re: Internet safety tips for teens and for the rest of us

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum